0 comments on “CEOS: Why your ‘Good’ Customer Service is probably just ‘Bare Minimum’”

CEOS: Why your ‘Good’ Customer Service is probably just ‘Bare Minimum’

A recent NY Times article titled ‘Why Tech Support is (Purposely) Unbearable’ says:

 “And you are not alone. Getting caught in a tech support loop — waiting on hold, interacting with automated systems, talking to people reading from unhelpful scripts and then finding yourself on hold yet again — is a peculiar kind of aggravation that mental health experts say can provoke rage in even the most mild-­mannered person.

Worse, just as you suspected, companies are aware of the torture they are putting you through.”

Bad as this situation is for customers and tech support employees alike, what this should do is to provide a wake up call to leaders who *think* they provide good customer service.

After all, good customer service is more than simply just taking care of customers after they have a question or a problem with your product or service. That’s the absolute bare minimum.

How do you know if you or your leadership team is guilty of providing ‘bare minimum’ service? If your primary barometer for how things are going with your customers is a lack of customer escalations to the C-Suite and a near-exclusive reliance on ‘one number’ like a Net Promoter Score or your Customer Satisfaction score, you are guilty of ‘bare minimum’ service.

What’s the single best way to make sure your company gives good customer service?

Listen to your customers, employees and the business, and apply what you learn — as part of your company’s DNA.

The 2016 Klever Knowledge Benchmark asked the question “If people in your workplace were sharing knowledge as well as they possibly could, it would improve productivity by:

Nearly 50% of respondents believe that their organization could be at least 30% more productive if they shared knowledge better. Tweet this.

 

Do you know of any other initiative that your own team believes will improve your organizational productivity 30% or more? Go ahead, I’ll wait. No, I didn’t think so.

Want to know which part of sales is making promises that can’t be kept? Whom in Professional Services is building elegant custom solutions that no one else can understand or support? What tweak in manufacturing could make warranty returns drop by 5% or more? What marketing efforts are costing more to support than they bring in? Talk to Tech Support.

Good customer service isn’t just about customers that don’t complain. It is extraordinarily good for your bottom line. Tweet this.

What to do next?

As a leader, the single biggest influence you can have is to fix your customer support metrics. Almost certainly, what your customer support leaders are measuring isn’t good enough. Unfortunately, that is about where most of us are. Fortunately, a number of us got together and are doing something about it.

A group of leaders and the leading associations in the Customer Support world jointly developed the first-ever open standard for Customer Support Metrics – the Open Customer Metrics Framework (OCMF). Stop what you are doing now, and check it out. It is completely free, and is powered by Klever.

If you want to know how well you are listening to your customers, employees and the business and applying what you learn, Klever has developed a highly-rated tool, the Enterprise Customer Support Capability Assessment. 14 questions, takes your support team 5 minutes to answer. You get deep and actionable insights.

0 comments on “It’s Time to Put Guiding, Not Grading into Practice: New Framework Emerges”

It’s Time to Put Guiding, Not Grading into Practice: New Framework Emerges

The Open Customer Metrics Framework V1 has arrived. 

0 comments on “Update: Five High Level Metrics in the New Framework for Customer Support”

Update: Five High Level Metrics in the New Framework for Customer Support

A working group made up of representatives from several industry-leading companies and professional associations has wrapped up its discussion this January of a new framework for customer support. The result of a series of meetings is a framework that focuses on five high level metrics. The chart below reflects the working group’s current thinking. For those of you who have been following these conversations, the group combined the financial health and value KPIs into one, “Business,” to simplify the conversation and reflect the different perspectives among externally facing customer support, internal support, professional services, and public sector/non-profit organizations.

0 comments on “How to measure the trajectory of your support organization – the acceleration measure”

How to measure the trajectory of your support organization – the acceleration measure

Most service and support executives I know want to know the answer to this question:

Is my organization fulfilling my customers’ needs better than it has before?

That’s a particularly hard question to answer in services and support. Team members constantly face a steady stream of new cases – we get one customer to their goal just to see the next one appear, needing help from the beginning.

0 comments on “New Metrics Framework Discussion Continues: Focus on Financial Health and Value”

New Metrics Framework Discussion Continues: Focus on Financial Health and Value

The group of industry leaders discussing the new metrics framework for customer support met for the third time on Friday, January 15, to drill down into two of the six high-level metrics: Financial Health and Value. Given the intense focus on these two dimensions by support leaders, we would have assumed that there would be quite a few known and recommended metrics that came out from this discussion. This wasn’t the case, but the discussion identified a wide variety of options and raised several interesting key points:

0 comments on “New Metrics Framework Discussions Continued: Focus on Customer and Employee Engagement”

New Metrics Framework Discussions Continued: Focus on Customer and Employee Engagement

The group of industry leaders discussing the new metrics framework for customer support met for the second time on Friday, January 8, to drill down into two of the six high-level metrics: Customer Engagement and Employee Engagement.

Customer Engagement. Phil Verghis, Klever co-founder and CEO, began the meeting by presenting proposed metrics for the Customer Engagement KPI, with Customer Composite score as the Executive level metric. This could include a relationship component (NPS, Customer Loyalty etc.) and a transactional component (Customer Satisfaction score).

2 comments on “A New Measures Framework for Customer Support”

A New Measures Framework for Customer Support

Join the movement and participate in the discussion to create a new framework and metrics for customer support. You’ve probably heard about the initiative to create a new framework fro customer support, led by Klever and a broad group of leaders, in Phil’s preview  of the upcoming report, Creating an Executive Dashboard for Customer Support.” We met on Friday, December 18, to share ideas about the six high-level metrics. The discussion was extremely productive, and we wanted to share the highlights of that discussion. Feel free to listen to the meeting recording to get the full context.

0 comments on “Measures, Metrics and Madness: The New World of Guiding Not Grading”

Measures, Metrics and Madness: The New World of Guiding Not Grading

By Phil Verghis

Background
For a few years now, leaders at customer support organizations have talked about moving customers from a ‘transaction-based’ service and support model to a ‘relationship-based’ one. This involves changing customers’ perceptions, from contacting you only when there are break-fix or how do I questions, to one that understands their business, including the technical and business context of their queries.